Learning

So it’s the end of my first full semester of seminary at Princeton Theological Seminary.  It has gone by much too fast.  I wish I could slow things down a bit.  There is so much pressure to learn things quickly.  This works if you are not trying to learn things in depth and connect information, but such is not the case with me.  I am learning that connections are very important to me.  And I have never said it quite that way before I let my fingers do the talking.  It seems to me that learning is a very personal thing.  Personal in that it should not be…institutionalized.  And yet that is exactly what we have done.  In learning and in worshiping.  Putting boundaries around things in the attempt to organize things and make them easier to understand.  And yet the opposite is accomplished.  We understand less because we sever the links.  Can you really truly only talk about “Christian History” without at the same time talk about theology, Christology,  soteriology, philosophy, politics, economics, and …?  So why do we do this?  To try and measure someone’s intelligence and ability to learn and understand?  As if a letter grade can really capture the essence of understanding.  I feel institutionalized education merely provides us lessons in…how to play the game.  That’s the only way I can think of it at this point.  But the first and second verses in 1 Corinthians 13 takes on new meaning for me here:

If I speak in Greek and Hebrew…and can fathom all mysteries and knowledge but have not love, I am nothing.

My point here is not about love, as wonderful as love is, but rather that knowledge is not power, contrary to the popular sentiment.  If there is any truth in this statement it is merely because we–society, humanity–have granted power to those who seem to be knowledgeable so we don’t have to rely on the Spirit to lead and guide as we discern what God would have us do.  At this point my thoughts are jumbled, but I assure you this thread has not run out but is weaving an afghan in my left cerebral hemisphere which now that I think of it, that very well might be the cause of my sinus problems.

Alas, I must translate some more Greek.

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